Tania Amador Foils Crypto Scammer Through Some Very Simple Steps

Crypto scammers are wrought throughout the space, and people are consistently on edge hoping they don’t fall victim to these malicious individuals, but when a thief’s plans go awry, the victim is likely to get a nice feeling inside. Such feelings are likely being experienced by Tania Amador, a 28-year-old resident of Grand Prairie, Texas.
Tania Amador Stops a Hacker in His Tracks
Amador claims that her Ring security system was hacked by a cryptocurrency scammer who demanded a bitcoin ransom of approximately $400,000 in exchange for relinquishing control.
Amador explains:
I was asleep, and our Ring alarm was going off like an intruder had entered our home. Then, we heard a voice coming from our camera. The voice was saying, ‘Ring support! Ring support! We would like to notify you that your account has been terminated by a hacker.’
The person who took over the system said that Amador should hand over 50 BTC units or else more than just her account would be terminated. You can probably fill in the blanks, here…
So, what did Amador and her boyfriend – who was staying with her at the time – decide to do? They simply removed the batteries from the camera. Amador says they chose to do this simply because they had no idea what was going on. This simple step turned out to be the ultimate foiling of the thief’s plans.
Removing the batteries disabled the camera and barred the thief from further access. Amador has not had to pay any bitcoin ransom as of late and is once again in charge of her own security system.
The conclusion is relieving, to say the least, though serious concerns have arisen thanks to what some analysts believe to be Ring’s inability to fully fight off hackers and cybercriminals. In the past, Ring systems have been hijacked by bad actors, though to be fair, this isn’t necessarily a fault of the system developers themselves, as a recent Google demonstration shows that malware has been built to specifically allow infiltration of Ring security cameras.
This malware sells for approximately six dollars at the time of writing.
Keeping the Safety Up
A Ring spokesperson has since emerged to explain that security is something the company works day and night to fix. They said:
Customer trust is important to Ring, and we take the security of our devices seriously. While we are still investigating this issue and are taking appropriate steps to protect our devices based on our investigation, we can confirm this incident is in no way related to a breach or compromise of Ring’s security. As a precaution, we highly and openly encourage all Ring users to enable two-factor authentication on their Ring accounts, add shared users (instead of sharing login credentials), use strong passwords and regularly change those passwords.
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